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Getting whānau involved

Kōrero pūrākau can provide a fun and friendly context through which whānau can share in and contribute to their children’s preparation for their future pathways.

Your learners will have lots of opportunities at school or kura to explore their future pathways, but there’s no denying that whānau are a key influence on young people's future directions.

Encouraging whānau input around kōrero pūrākau

Illustration of Taranga setting Māui out to voyage on the sea

Whānau may have their own kōrero pūrākau to share with their rangatahi

Here are some tips to help encourage whānau to share in their young people's learning through the magic of kōrero pūrākau:

  • Keep whānau informed about what their young people are learning at school so that they can talk with them about these stories and the key themes of those stories.
  • Invite parents and whānau along to workshops to participate as storytellers or as part of the audience.
  • Invite whānau and kaumātua along to share iwi or hapū stories that convey key messages or themes that fit in with your teaching and learning programme.
  • Celebrate your learners’ development and learning with parents and whānau. If learners participate well in a kōrero pūrākau workshop, let their whānau know.
  • Encourage whānau to share kōrero pūrākau with their young people at home to help them discuss important life themes, values and key messages they want to share with their young people.
  • Set up a kōrero pūrākau folder for each learner. You and the learner can both add information throughout the year about key messages and themes that the learner has picked up during the kōrero pūrākau workshops. Use this folder to facilitate discussion with learners and their whānau.

Updated 2 Oct 2019